The novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, is set in the s in the southern state of Alabama where racism was a part of their culture. Tom Robinson who was falsely accused for raping a white woman, Mayella, was declared guilty, purely based on the fact that Tom was a black man and Mayella was a white woman The racism was part of the context of the novel for the time period of which it took place.

The people who had prejustice ideas made up the majority of the town. Scout had to overcome the established ideals of the town in order to mature. To add on to the oddities of Maycomb, the destiny for most of the people in the town were based on what part of society their parents and ancestors were part of.

When Eliza was approached by Higgins, she had nothing to lose due to the fact she is poor. Learning from Higgins seemed like a great choice because Higgins had experience in his field.

Of course, when Eliza was mistreated by Higgins, Eliza did not find anything about the mistreatment funny. If Eliza were to read or watch what happened to her and Higgins after the whole situation was over, there is high chance that she would find the situation funny. The changing and growth of children throughout their life is an inevitable thing that will happen. Scout Finch from the novel To Kill a Mockingbird is not only a child subjected to the age of racism and Jim Crow Laws, but narrated the horrible events that go on throughout.

The time that they lived in after the abolishment of slavery subjects them to extreme bias on the way they viewed blacks and other races either for the better or worse. Some ideas and examples and good evidence for the cause of how Scouted morals are effected. As a child is young, they learn how to mature throw people and experiences. Many people in this novel have this effect on the character "Scout".

To Kill A Mockingbird Coming Of Age Analysis

Scout learns to mature through the court case involving Tom Robinson, the innocent African American man in the story, as well as an isolated, misunderstood man named Arthur "Boo" Radley. Leonard F. Throughout the book, however, she encounters many difficult situations. She undergoes becoming a lady not the mention she deals with racism throughout her town. She even has to deal with rumors of Boo Radley. Pursuing this further, Scout making this connection is very mature and clever of her.

She is only nine years old and understands why Mr. Tate would lie about what happened to Bob…. Lee experienced a rape case within her hometown and uses that experiences to help her write how the characters feel. She also used it to create the theme coming of age, which was true for her as well as a kid. Coming of age is a theme throughout To Kill a Mockingbird, but one scene that shows all three of the kids experiencing the coming of age is how they all grow up and show it through the experiences of the trial.

All kids grow up innocent and with a sense of imagination, but in To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout, Dill, and Jem are cut short in their childhood due to a brutal trial that opens their eyes. No matter how hard Atticus tries to keep…. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is a novel about a small town in the south during the great depression. The social order in the town has been established by generations of the same families living there. Two children, Jem and Scout, grow up with the guidance of their wise father, Atticus, and realize all the racism and discrimination in the town and how wrong it is.

When Atticus takes on the a case to defend a black man who was wrongly accused of rape. Best-selling novel To Kill a Mockingbird has a deep focus on prejudice in southern America during the 's.

Author Harper Lee uses a wide range of characters and experiences through the eyes of young Jean Louise Finch to communicate issues present with prejudice and their long term effects throughout the story. Known as an unfair judgement or action towards someone without solid evidence, the topic of prejudice is supported by Atticus 's famous quote within the novel "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view" Through careful examination of the story and various encounters the children had with prejudice, it is clearly evident that males are the main victims of prejudice throughout the….Please join StudyMode to read the full document.

Throughout the book To Kill A Mockingbird Jem changes from a young twelve year old boy to more of an adult figure.

to kill a mockingbird literary analysis essay coming of age

Harper Lee shows Jem changing emotionally, mentally and socially. Throughout the book Jem starts to grow out of playing with Scout. He begins to look up to different people and he starts to realize how discriminating his community really is, learning that people should not be judged by what you hear and see.

Events such as Tom Robinson's trial have a big impact on Jem and his change. Jem changes emotionally throughout the book. He starts to go with what he feels in his gut, and begins to grow apart from Scout and Dill becoming more like his father. Jem's first emotional change was when Mrs Dubose died. At the beggining of the book he doesn't quite know about the world and people but near the end he understands people's motivations and prejudices a bit better. Jem starts to think like an adult as he gets older in the book.

Throughout the book he develops a mind more like his father's. Jem starts to think back to both At first, Scout does not understand the meaning of his words, but as she matures through the novel, her eyes are unveiled, and she understands what Atticus is trying to tell her. Over time, Jem, too, starts to see the meaning and depth of the statement.

Throughout the course of the book, Jem and Scout both learn that one must know and respect people for who they are as individuals, not for what they appear to be.

Dolphus Raymond is a character who is known by the citizens of Maycomb County for what he appears to be, but Scout recognizes that he is not what he seems to be.

Raymond is a wealthy white man who has mixed children, a black wife, and his company is usually made up of Negros. As a cover-up for his abnormal behavior, he pretends to be drunk all the time. In truth, he is just trying to give Maycomb a reason for his unorthodox actions when it comes to his strong friendships with Negros.

Like Atticus, Mr. Raymond believes that blacks should be respected more and Jem's Development as a Young Adult In the fictional novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, one of the main characters goes through various situations that ultimately contribute to his coming of age. Scout, the main character and narrator, retells the remarkable events of her childhood that lead up to the explanation of how her brother, Jem, broke his arm.

During the flashbacks, Scout also documents and comments on Jem's maturation into a young adult, as well as the lives of the Maycomb residents. Jem's devastation over the outcome of Tom Robinson's case forces him to see the people of Maycomb in a darker light, erasing his childhood ignorance.

Connecting Tom's innocence to other instances in his life, such as saving the roly poly, prove his morals change. Jem taking responsibility for Mrs. Dubose's flowers shows that Jem evolves and realises that he must take accountability for his actions.

The verdict of Tom Robinson's case, saving the roly poly, and taking responsibility for Mrs. Dubose's flowers contribute to the shaping of Jem into a mature, young adult.

Jem's disappointment with the verdict of Tom Robinson's case leads to his coming of age. His dissatisfaction with the verdict strips Jem of his childish, ignorant views of the townspeople. I always thought Maycomb folks were Could growing up change how you viewed the world before?

Throughout the book, Scout goes through a path where she encounters maturity. In this passage, the literary elements characterization, external conflict and voice portray the theme of coming to age.

Calpurnia expresses her characteristics with provocative language when scolding towards Scout. Scout brings over a friend, Walter Cunningham, for dinner as an apology for brutally attacking him in the schoolyard.There are numerous moments in To Kill a Mockingbird when Scout and Jem learn something fundamental about human culture and in return, something about themselves.

Besides race relations and the history of the struggle for equality in the South, the novel is a coming of age text, mostly dealing with Scout's maturation. Lee conveys this theme this by using a variety of literary elements such as symbolism, imagery, tone and motif to express the overall theme. Using these elements, Lee demonstrates character. The setting of the story is in Maycomb, Alabama during the s when racism and prejudice was common pre- Civil Rights movement.

to kill a mockingbird literary analysis essay coming of age

Throughout the novel, the theme becomes increasingly evident as we follow Scout through the early years of her childhood and witness her becoming more informed about her community. As the author is conveying the theme to the audience, it is noticeable. Many authors use coming-of-age themes to show the progression of a character throughout a novel or story.

To Kill a Mockingbird-Coming of Age

In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee has a continuing theme of coming-of-age throughout her novel. Coming-of-age involves recognizing different perspectives.

In Harper. They begin to leave behind their innocent childhood views and develop a more realistic view on the world around them as they step forward into adulthood.

Need to add transition Many authors have a coming of age theme in their books; specifically, Harper Lee portrays a coming of age theme in his book To Kill A Mockingbird. Through the journeys of their childhoods, Jem and Scout lose their innocence while experiencing their coming of age.

The novel tells the story of Jem and Scout Finch two children who are forced to grow up and face the harsh realities of the world when their dad is chosen to represent a man in one of the biggest cases their small town of Maycomb, Alabama has ever seen. The themes present in To Kill A Mockingbird were relevant when.

A Time to Kill and To Kill a Mockingbird both have a number of similarities to be compared and contrasted.

Both stories can be compared in their themes about justice and racial prejudice. However, this is where the similarities end. The themes and ideas in both novels are vastly different in shape and scope. In A Time to Kill justice is the main theme and most of the ideas are focused on justice and the gray in between the lines of black and white set by the law, racial prejudice is also touched.

Scout begins the novel as a six year old girl who does not fully recognise how skewed her world is until she is nine and sees what it really means to kill a mockingbird due to the actions of a shy Arthur Radley. Well reading to Kill a Mockingbird, many themes and concepts have been said but many are unclear and misunderstood.

In this story Scout, a little white girl, experiences life and what it is like to have inequalities socially and economically. Scout learns about coming of age alongside her father who is defending an innocent black person whom was accused of rape.

Scott also learns the difference between rumors and facts when it comes to Boo Radley. There were two themes that were very important throughout. Point of View: Harper Lee 's first, only novel is written in first person due to the fact we see the whole story through Scout 's perspective. Theme: One of the crucial themes that Lee based the novel on was racism, which was an extremely controversial topic at the time the book was published.

The Theme of Coming of Age in Literature There comes a time is each person's life when they reach the point where they are no longer children, but adults.

The transition from a child into a young adult is often referred to as the "coming of age," or growing up.Scout begins the novel as a six year old girl who does not fully recognise how skewed her world is until she is nine and sees what it really means to kill a mockingbird due to the actions of a shy Arthur Radley.

Point of View: Harper Lee 's first, only novel is written in first person due to the fact we see the whole story through Scout 's perspective. Theme: One of the crucial themes that Lee based the novel on was racism, which was an extremely controversial topic at the time the book was published.

It is a commentary on. To Kill a Mockingbird in While many authors wrote masterpieces for adults, Harper wrote her novel for an audience of teens and young adults Michiyo. Surprisingly, the novel gained widespread popularity despite tackling controversial issues.

This characterized the unique qualities of the novel, which few other books have been able to achieve. This plot dives into the social issues faced by African-Americans in the south, like Tom Robinson.

Lee felt that the unfair treatment towards blacks were persistent, not coming to an end any time in the foreseeable future. This dark movement drove her to publish this novel hopeful that it would encourage the society to realize that the harsh racism must stop. Lee effectively. It describes how a series of events shakes their innocence, shaping their character and teaching them about human nature. In her novel, Lee demonstrates how these children learn about the essentiality of good and evil and the existence of injustice and racism in the Deep South during the s.

Almost every society, past or present, has at least some sort of institutionalized groups that can be defined as social classes, and Maycomb County is not any different. Within this county, there are many different social classes. These classes are often separated by race and occupation. A useful way to envision these divisions would be to picture a ladder or a pyramid. On the top wrung of the ladder, in most societies at the current place and time, are the wealthy, white people.

Southern Alabama. Analysis Throughout the first half of Mockingbird Harper Lee builds a sweet and loving portrait of growing up in the disappeared world of small town Alabama. Harper Lee, nevertheless, proceeds to undermine her depiction of small town gentility throughout the second half of the book. Lee dismantles the sweet facade to disclose a rotten, rural underside filled with prejudice, ignorance, and social lies. However, no one in Mockingbird is totally evil or good. Every character is human, with human.

Harper Lee, in the realistic-fiction novel To Kill A Mockingbird, uses a variety of literary elements to aid in the overall development of the theme.In her first year at school, Scout is very quick to get into fights.

She does not know what it means, but from the way Cecil says it she figures that it is not a good thing. The only reason she does fight Cecil is because she thinks she is defending Atticus. Her emotional attachment to Atticus is the reason she fights Cecil, making her emotionally immature. Aunt Alexandra forces Scout to wear a dress instead of her overalls because she is too boyish. Dubose on the day of her death. These values affect Scout harmfully as it imposes that she is not a girl because of the way she acts.

Though through these comments the audience can learn about how immoral it is to tell someone to live their life a certain way. While Scout is calming down, Jem tries to show off his chest hair, which is nowhere to be seen. Scout believes that people are people and there is nothing else to it.

Alexandra ploys to make Scout more ' Lady like ' and berating Scout for not wanting to wear dresses makes Scout grow to dislike her Aunt. While Atticus worked on the Tom Robinson case Alexandra comes to Maycomb to live with Scout and Jem to provide a 'feminine influence '. Aunt Alexandra, along with the rest of the Finch Household does not approve of Atticus defending a Tom Robinson, a black man. As the Tom Robinson case goes on Alexandra sees how passionate Atticus is about giving Tom a fair trial.

When Tom Robinson is found guilty Alexandra notices the effects of racism and how much it bothers her nephew. These conflicts better shape the way she is. Some of those problems include Scout failing to convince her father to not let her go to school, Nathan Radley cementing the hole, and when Scout has to go with Jem to read to Ms.

Those conflicts taught scout a painful lesson and improved herself from what she used to be. First off, when scout fails to convince her father to let her stay home from school, he refuses. To scout, this seems like a lethal blow. Scout does not hold her ground and stay true to what her father told her Scout does not know the hurtful prejudice behind this statement. Scout morally knows that African-Americans are not treated fairly, but she does not really understand racism.

Scout proves her reactions to…. Atticus has as much dislike for Bob Ewell that Bob Ewell has for him. This teaches both Scout and Jem that it is not worth it to fight back. Scout got into a few scuffles in the beginning of the book. If Scout sees Atticus fight back against Bob Ewell then she would think it is fine to fight back.Please join StudyMode to read the full document.

Could growing up change how you viewed the world before? Throughout the book, Scout goes through a path where she encounters maturity. In this passage, the literary elements characterization, external conflict and voice portray the theme of coming to age.

Calpurnia expresses her characteristics with provocative language when scolding towards Scout. Scout brings over a friend, Walter Cunningham, for dinner as an apology for brutally attacking him in the schoolyard. During dinner, Walter was pouring syrup all over his food.

In addition to this, Scout was pointing out his flaws which made him self-conscious about himself. As a result, this lead to Calpurnia giving an infuriating lecture to Scout about disrespecting Walter during dinner.

Scout then registers humiliation for being reproached.

to kill a mockingbird literary analysis essay coming of age

This quote describes that Calpurnia is not the type to think differently the way we were raised since we all are human. There were two main experiences where Scout could see herself come of age. Not only that, but she reflects on those occurrences and ask the question, why? At the beginning of the novel, Boo Radley is addressed.

To Kill a Mockingbird (10/10) Movie CLIP - Scout Meets Boo Radley (1962) HD

Despite this, Scout, her brother Jem, and her friend Dill always attempted to try and get Boo out of his creepy abode. Curiosity grew, until the three of them trespassed into the property. Once Mr. Radley caught sight of them, they attempted to flee the scene. Later that evening, Jem returned to retrieve them, he found them sewed and neatly folded. At first, Scout does not understand the meaning of his words, but as she matures through the novel, her eyes are unveiled, and she understands what Atticus is trying to tell her.

Over time, Jem, too, starts to see the meaning and depth of the statement. Throughout the course of the book, Jem and Scout both learn that one must know and respect people for who they are as individuals, not for what they appear to be.

Dolphus Raymond is a character who is known by the citizens of Maycomb County for what he appears to be, but Scout recognizes that he is not what he seems to be.

Raymond is a wealthy white man who has mixed children, a black wife, and his company is usually made up of Negros. As a cover-up for his abnormal behavior, he pretends to be drunk all the time.

In truth, he is just trying to give Maycomb a reason for his unorthodox actions when it comes to his strong friendships with Negros. Like Atticus, Mr.

Theme Of Coming To Age In To Kill A Mockingbird

Raymond believes that blacks should be respected more andAs Atticus gets involved and tried to bring out the truth in the trial of Tom Robinson, a black man falsey accused of raping a white girl, the children undergo a traumatic experience of coming of age. The experiences they had to undergo can be seen either in favour of or against their growing up and entering the adult world. It can be argued that the experiences Scot, Jem and Dill had in connection with the Tim Robinson trial had a negative effect on their development of social cosciousness.

They could have been kept away from the disappointing aspects of racism and the tendency of people to lead clistered community lives. When Calpurnia took the children to the black church, they noticed the cultural difference of black people from their community, and came to contact with the poverty, ignorance and helplessness that were thrust on the colored people. The children are thus exposed to the uneven social status and differences among communities at a very young age, detsroying their childhood dreams and preoccupations.

When they confront the lynch mob in front of the prison also, they confront the reality that people can be turned reckless when they deal with the issues of race, and a just man like their father can be the target of their wrath. In the court, they sit among the blacks during the trial and witness the trial in which it is proven beyond doubt that Tom is innocent and the accusers, the disreputed Bob Ewell and his daughter Mayella were lying.

However, the white jury convicts Tom at the face of clear evidence contrary to their verdict. The children, espeically Jem who is the eldest among them facing the choices of good and evil in his conscience, are disillusioned when Tom becomes a victim at the hands of ruthless racism. This can be seen as having a negative impact on the development of moral values of the children, as they are susceptible to loosing faith in the basic goodness of life.

to kill a mockingbird literary analysis essay coming of age

However, the novel has a moral philosophy of its own, and when seen from its perspective, the children have undergone a real education in life, regarding the real nature of human values. It was a necessary initiation to the harsh realities of life, and they learn to see the truth beyond prejudices. They get gradually convinced of the arguments by their father that one needs to understand other people from their perspective and not from our views on them which are formed by social conventions.

Jem shows that he is capable of meeting the demands of the adult world when he refuses to leave the place when the aggressive lynch mob threatened Atticus. Scout exposes her childhood innocence on many occasions, and the most significant among them is when addresses a manqamong the lynch mob, Mr.

Walter Cunnigham, and asks about his son with whom she went to school. This changes the mood altogether and Mr. Cunnigham takes the intiative to disperse the mob.

Incidents like this must definitely have instilled the right amount of confidence in the children regarding the basic goodness of human heart, even among those people who are forced to fall prey to rude and thoughtless behaviour. Though the courtroom and the trial exposed the children to further racial differences and prejudices, they must have also got an opportunity, like the readers, to develop a compassionate attitude towards the sects of people who oppressed and misrepresented.

The intense frustration that the children must have experienced as they witnessed the victory injustice may hopefully lead them to fight against the same in their future life, as they grow up as adults who try to see the truth behind everything before forming their opinions on them. References Lee, Harper. To Kill A Mocking Bird. New York: Warner Books, Disclaimer: This work has been donated by a student. This is not an example of the work produced by our Essay Writing Service.

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